Satoshi: Why Newsweek Isn’t Convincing

UPDATE: Thoroughly debunked – http://www.mikehearn.com/Hosted-Files/Nakamoto-Could-Newsweek-Have-Known/index.html

Whether you follow the happenings of Bitcoin or not, the bigger issue with the Newsweek article claiming to unmask the identity of Bitcoin founder Nakamoto is a prime demonstration of poor journalism and ethics in the interest of generating buzz. If it was Gawker, nobody would blink, but Newsweek? Not only did Leah Goodman’s article provide little to no actual real evidence of her claims, it instead relys on conjecture and quotes without context, ignoring basic journalistic guidelines. She used deception, a lack of objective methodology and still to date hasn’t provided hard evidence to back her claims up.

She instead enlists in vague statements from two ‘forensics experts’ including a genealogist (ie. the study of family trees) posing as ‘Systems Engineers’. Naturally, no evidence from them either. When challenged, she states she has hard evidence … but refuses to provide it. Her rebuttal amidst demands for the evidence – Newsweek is reputable, and she is reputable, therefore, the world should just believe them. Yes, she really did say that. Delusional hole-digging is well underway.

Naturally, with Newsweek’s $1 sale price in 2010 amidst a mountain of debt and poor circulation figures, it comes as no surprise that any publicity is good publicity. There are countless counter-articles and thorough research disproving just about every aspect of the original Newsweek article, but one the most persuasive is Felix Salmon’s (of Reuters), linked below.

“But here’s where one of the main areas of mutual incomprehension comes into play. Impoco and Goodman are mainstream-media journalists producing mainstream content for a mass audience; Goodman’s article was probably already pushing the limits of what Impoco felt comfortable with, given that he couldn’t reasonably assume that most of his readers had even heard of bitcoin. Impoco was interested in creating a splashy magazine article, for the print reincarnation of a storied mass-market newsweekly.”

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